1. situpsandfruitcups:

    romanticizedweakling:

    "i was born in the wrong century," the girl sighs as she imagines a future where women have full ownership of their own bodies

    Pleasantly surprised where this went

    Reblogged from: whataremonsters
  2. zombiekatee:

thegreatnat-sby:

katherineviolette:

charliehadalittlewolf:

tuhhveit:

elsiesmarina:

themightyquinn666:

sorry everyone

Excuse me.
One of the first women to start her own independent production company.
Earned her way to stardom without sleeping with executives for roles.
Refused to date people for publicity just because 20th Century Fox wanted her to.
Left 20th Century Fox because she refused to let them get away with treating her badly and paying her a tiny wage, just because of her “dumb blonde” image.
Was only paid a fraction of her co-star’s wage even though she was the star of the movies and the biggest box office pull, but still went ahead with the movies because she was so passionate about acting.
Studied method acting at the Actors Studio with Lee Strasberg, who said that she was one of his best students along with Marlon Brando.
Had a personal library of over 500 books and rarely read fiction - she was desperate to learn and educate herself.
Was sexually abused as a child but then went on to encourage the sexual liberation of women in the 1950s. 
One of the first people to speak openly about sexual abuse.
One of the first people to openly support gay rights.
Supported many charities such as the Milk Fund, March of Dimes, Arthritis and Rheumatism foundation.
Donated her time and money to these charities.
Visited orphanages and hospitals on her own time to surprise the people there.
Married one of the greatest literary minds of the 20th century
Suffered two miscarriages and one ectopic pregnancy and still put on a brave face for her fans.
Sorry, did you say she wasn’t a role model? 

marilyn is my biggest role model so don’t even go there

and let’s not forget this

Ella Fitzgerald was not allowed to play at the popular Mocambo, in Hollywood, because of her race. Marilyn, who loved her music and supported civil rights, called the owner of the Mocambo and told him that if he booked Ella immediately, she would take a front table every night. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. After that, Ella never had to play in a small jazz club again.
"She was an unusual woman – a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it." - Ella Fitzgerald about Marilyn Monroe

OH SHIT YOU JUST GOT SERVED

I got goosebumps reading this. Amazing.

I will always reblog this. She has the mind and heart I’ve always admired, I strive to be like her every day.

    zombiekatee:

    thegreatnat-sby:

    katherineviolette:

    charliehadalittlewolf:

    tuhhveit:

    elsiesmarina:

    themightyquinn666:

    sorry everyone

    Excuse me.

    • One of the first women to start her own independent production company.
    • Earned her way to stardom without sleeping with executives for roles.
    • Refused to date people for publicity just because 20th Century Fox wanted her to.
    • Left 20th Century Fox because she refused to let them get away with treating her badly and paying her a tiny wage, just because of her “dumb blonde” image.
    • Was only paid a fraction of her co-star’s wage even though she was the star of the movies and the biggest box office pull, but still went ahead with the movies because she was so passionate about acting.
    • Studied method acting at the Actors Studio with Lee Strasberg, who said that she was one of his best students along with Marlon Brando.
    • Had a personal library of over 500 books and rarely read fiction - she was desperate to learn and educate herself.
    • Was sexually abused as a child but then went on to encourage the sexual liberation of women in the 1950s. 
    • One of the first people to speak openly about sexual abuse.
    • One of the first people to openly support gay rights.
    • Supported many charities such as the Milk Fund, March of Dimes, Arthritis and Rheumatism foundation.
    • Donated her time and money to these charities.
    • Visited orphanages and hospitals on her own time to surprise the people there.
    • Married one of the greatest literary minds of the 20th century
    • Suffered two miscarriages and one ectopic pregnancy and still put on a brave face for her fans.

    Sorry, did you say she wasn’t a role model? 

    marilyn is my biggest role model so don’t even go there

    and let’s not forget this

    Ella Fitzgerald was not allowed to play at the popular Mocambo, in Hollywood, because of her race. Marilyn, who loved her music and supported civil rights, called the owner of the Mocambo and told him that if he booked Ella immediately, she would take a front table every night. The owner said yes, and Marilyn was there, front table, every night. After that, Ella never had to play in a small jazz club again.

    "She was an unusual woman – a little ahead of her times. And she didn’t know it." - Ella Fitzgerald about Marilyn Monroe

    OH SHIT YOU JUST GOT SERVED

    I got goosebumps reading this. Amazing.

    I will always reblog this. She has the mind and heart I’ve always admired, I strive to be like her every day.

    Reblogged from: strangeparkings
  3. no-more-ramen:

    no-more-ramen:

    for new followers, no-more-ramen has an array of tags to help ensure that you can find affordable, yummy recipes that are safe for you to eat! here is a list of our current tags for this —

    happy eating, lil’ chefs! <3

    now also featuring:

    :)

    Reblogged from: no-more-ramen
  4. hamishwatson:

    thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

    bert-and-ernie-are-gay:

    kluckleberry:

    #while bbc sherlock is at the stage where sherlock and john are finally discovering their love for each other #the movies have flown straight past flirting and into husband land

    Interviewer: Tell us about your relationship with Robert Downey Jr on set.
    Jude Law: Oh, I love him. I love him.
    Interviewer: Yeah? You had a bit of a bromance going on there.
    Jude Law: What is this new term everyone is using?
    Interviewer: Bromance?
    Jude Law: Oh, it’s a horrible term. What about just a romance?
    Interviewer: No, it’s not the same.
    Jude Law: Why not? Why?
    Interviewer: Cause then you’d have to star in a romantic comedy together or something.
    Jude Law: We just have. Have you not seen it? [x]

    Jude Law does not have time for any of that ‘No Homo’ bullshit…

    FuCK JUDE LAW WENT FROM 0 TO 100 REAL QUICK

    Reblogged from: goldenboydean
  5. socimages:

Nope!
Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.
Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.
Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

    socimages:

    Nope!

    Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.

    By Lisa Wade, PhD

    A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.

    Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

    Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.

    Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.

    Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

    Reblogged from: stfueverything
  6. thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

mutantlexi:

werewolfchaos:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

mutantlexi:

I like my women like I like my waffles.

Hehehehehehehe…

fired and butted with syrup?

*eyes with interest* ….syrup you say? I am intrigued and would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

Sexy ladies and waffles
Both things which are fun to eat…and even better when covered in syrup ;D

    thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

    mutantlexi:

    werewolfchaos:

    thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

    mutantlexi:

    I like my women like I like my waffles.

    Hehehehehehehe…

    fired and butted with syrup?

    *eyes with interest* ….syrup you say? I am intrigued and would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

    Sexy ladies and waffles

    Both things which are fun to eat…and even better when covered in syrup ;D

    Reblogged from: thefingerfuckingfemalefury
  7. liasangria:

    things I like:

    • drawing
    • terrible puns
    • myself

    things I dislike:

    • drawing 
    • terrible puns
    • myself
    Reblogged from: beagletime
  8. secretlesbians:

    Depictions of Lesbianism by Henri Toulouse Lautrec

    During his life, Lautrec spent a lot of time in Montmarte, the bohemian centre of 19th century Paris and home to artists, philosophers, writers, performers, and prostitutes. He spent a lot of time with the sex workers there, and discovered that many of them had intimate relationships with one another.

    Lautrec’s depiction of lesbianism is particularly notable because it doesn’t fetishise sexual intimacy between women or present it as spectacle for the male gaze. Lautrec was trying to capture small, tender moments in the lives of the women he met, and he did so with humanity and sensitivity. In a world of constructed sexuality and fantasy, he finds the real relationships, and reveals to us the hidden lives of queer women in the 19th century.

    Fin-de-siècle Paris was the capital of lesbianism. However, until the mid century, and despite the acknowledgment of male homosexuality, female homosexuality had been considered absurd. This scepticism was grounded in the fact that many nineteenth-century psychologists and medical professionals did not believe in female sexual impulse. Thus, when instances of lesbianism were reported in Alexandre Parent-Duchâtelet’s 1836 study of prostitution in Paris, lesbianism came to be understood as an activity associated with the Montmartre counterculture and, in particular, with prostitution. Indeed, deluxe houses of tolerance often functioned as specialty brothels that catered for a clientele with particular fetishes, such as tableaux vivants where ‘inmates, entirely naked, abandon themselves to homosexual practices on a large black velvet carpet or in rooms hung with black satin to bring out the whiteness of their bodies’. This was lesbianism as commercial spectacle, performed within a closed environment for male consumption.

    Lesbianism in the public realm was a sexual preference that, while common, was negatively judged by French conservative society and for this reason was conducted with subtlety and partially obscured. In fact, many of the biggest stars of the Parisian circuses, dance halls and café-concerts were lesbian or bisexual, including Jane Avril and May Milton (whom, it is generally agreed, had a short-lived love affair), Sarah Bernhardt, Cha-u-ka-o and La Goulue. Whilst these Montmartre celebrities were depicted on multiple occasions by Lautrec, the artist chose to represent them as skilled professionals, never exploiting their sexual preference as the main focus of his compositions. So subtle was Lautrec in his treatment of these themes that art historians such as David Sweetman have gone so far as to argue that ‘It comes as something of a shock to realise that most of the women … were in fact lesbians and that quite a few were lovers. So many, in fact, that it is possible to argue that lesbianism is the hidden subtext of much of the art of Henri’s mature years.’

    - from nga.gov.au

    Images shown:

    1. At the Moulin Rouge: The Women Dancing

    2. In Bed

    3. The Kiss

    4. Two Friends

    5. Les Deux Amies

    Reblogged from: petrichoriousparalian
  9. Reblogged from: highschoolmusicool
  10. jointheeggvolution:

    wynesthesia:

    ashleeta:

    thelingerieaddict:

    I cannot believe Curvy Kate’s audacity to outright steal the work of a high school student for some insipid marketing message.

    Shame on you, Curvy Kate. Shame on you.

    Via: The Curvy Kate Facebook Page

    Original image via: Rosea Posey

    SIGNAL BOOST RIP THEM A NEW ONE TUMBLR!

    IT’S NOT EVEN A THING YOU SHOULD MARKET

    NOT ONLY DID YOU STEAL THE GIRL’S WORK

    YOU FUCKING HAD NO IDEA WHAT SHE WAS TRYING TO SAY

    FUCK

    FUCK YOU

    goddamn

    THEY COMPLETELY RUINED HER MESSAGE AND TURNED IT UPSIDE DOWN. WHAT THE FUCK. WHAT THE ACTUAL FUCK I’M SO FUCKING MAD

    Reblogged from: stfueverything
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